Featured: September 2015
Photo by: Mike Hopping
Baorangia bicolor, formerly Boletus bicolor, was thought to differ from the poisonous Boletus sensibilus by lacking a curry smell. Not necessarily, according to Michael Kuo. Boletus sensibilus does have longer tubes, (10 mm + at maturity versus 3-8 mm for bicolor) but B. pallidoroseus (smells like beef bouillon), B. pseudosensibilus, and B. carminipes share the same general color scheme, have short tubes, and are of uncertain edibility. Bottomline: study up before chowing down on red-capped boletes with yellow pores that bruise blue.

Featured: July 2015
Photo by: Mike Hopping
The bluing bolete, Gyroporus cyanescens, isn’t the commonest thing in the woods, but it is memorable. That pale, scruffy mushroom with the matted top suddenly turns intense blue wherever it’s touched. The pore surface is initially white but ages to pale yellow. This mushroom, like its cousin the chestnut bolete, is brittle and has a hollowing stalk. It is also edible, with a mild bolete flavor.

Featured: May 2015
Photo by: Mike Hopping
Entoloma vernum, the springtime Entoloma, is a probably poisonous, woodland lookalike for the marginally edible deer mushroom. Both species have gills that brown with age and a pink spore print (seen on the mushroom to the right). The gills of the springtime Entoloma are usually slightly attached to the stalk, not widely free as in the deer mushroom. Neither species has a partial veil (skirt or ring on the stalk).Entolomas grow from the soil, not wood or buried wood. The stalk in this species and its summertime cousin, Entoloma strictium, is hollow and typically decorated with a spiraling corduroy texture. The taste is said to be undistinctive—not like radishes. Again, don’t eat it.